Journal of Applied Ichthyology
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Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore2.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.360
Impact Factor0.9

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 Journal profile

Journal of Applied Ichthyology publishes original research and review articles on applied ichthyology, aquaculture, and marine fisheries, including management of fisheries resources, fisheries ecology, fish health and pathology.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Professor Gouranga Biswas is a Senior Scientist at ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education. His research focuses on brackish water aquaculture, integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, species and system diversification, and fish and shellfish immunology.

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Research Article

Fishes of the Alitash National Park: Taxonomic Accounts with Identification Keys of Fish in Floodplain Rivers of Abbay and Tekeze Basins, Ethiopia

Ethiopia has considerable freshwater potential. Currently, the recognized fish diversity in the country’s freshwater ecosystem is more than 200. Despite the presence of such high fish diversity with considerable economic returns, ichthyofaunal studies on Ethiopian rivers are scarce. Thus, this study aimed to identify and compare ichthyofaunal diversity and distribution in floodplain rivers of the Abbay and Tekeze Basins, Ethiopia. Fish were collected using gillnets, cast nets, hooks, electrofishing, and mosquito nets and identified to the species level. Gillnets had stretched mesh sizes of 4–14 cm with a panel length of 25–75 m and a width of 1.5–2 m per mesh size. They were set in the afternoon (5:00 p.m.) and lifted the following morning (7:30 a.m.). Immediately after capture, fish were preliminary identified in the field and tagged with proper information (e.g., sampling locality and date of collection). Similar fishing efforts were applied at all sampling sites for two dry and two wet months over a period of two years (2018-2019). In the present study, both alpha and beta diversity indices were also examined. Identification keys and an annotated checklist of species were generated for easy naming of the entire fish species in the basins. In the ichthyological collection, 43 fish species with 11 new records from the Ayima, Gelegu, and Shinfa Rivers were identified. The first two rivers in the Abbay Basin were the richest in species and number of individuals. Gelegu River had the highest abundance as well. Generally, this study was conducted in areas where no fish biodiversity studies have been undertaken, and the results obtained from this study could be important for fish biodiversity conservation.

Research Article

Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of 39 Demersal Fish Species of an Estuarine-Coastal Ecosystem from the Northwestern of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico

The length-weight (LW) and length-length (LL) relationships of 39 demersal fish species belonging to 19 families were calculated. Fish samples were collected monthly during the open (September–February) and close (March–August) shrimp fishing seasons from 2014 to 2022 by the artisanal fishery in the Bahía Magdalena-Almejas lagoon system (BMA), using small boats and a shrimp bottom trawl with 16–17 m top rope and 38 mm mesh opening. Total (TL) and standard (SL) lengths and total weight (TW) were measured for all fish specimens. The b parameter of the LW relationship ranged from the minimum of 2.483 for Cynoscion parvipinnis to 3.775 as the maximum for Bagre panamensis while, for the LL relationship, the parameter b ranged from 0.685 for Balistes polylepis to 0.994 for Orthopristis cantharinus. Both LW and LL relationships were highly correlated (; . The parameter b of the LW relationship indicated that 59% of the fish species showed isometric and 41% allometric growth. Information on LW and LL relationships is updated for thirteen species, and four are reported for the first time: Citharichthys xanthostigma, Ophidion galeoides, Pleuronichthys guttulatus, and P. ritteri. This study will be useful to update the LW relationship parameters for data-poor fish species and contribute to the accuracy of fish stock assessment in the BMA fisheries.

Research Article

Effects of Salinity on the Egg Fertilization, Hatching, and Tadpole Growth and Survival Rates of the Thailand Frog (Rana tigerina Dubois, 1981)

We studied the effects of salinity on the egg fertilization, hatching, and tadpole growth and survival rates of the Thailand frog (Rana tigerina Dubois, 1981), an introduced species that is commonly cultured in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Salinity levels of 2, 6, and 4% significantly affected the fertilization and hatching rates of the eggs, as well as the tadpole survival rates from the newly hatched to yolk sac exhaustion stages, respectively . Notably, during the stage from yolk sac exhaustion to juvenile tadpole, a salinity of 3% resulted in an increase in the final weight of the tadpoles throughout the stage and a significant increase in Phase 1 (the tadpole stage from yolk sac exhaustion to the onset of foreleg emergence) and Phase 2 (the tadpole stage from the onset of foreleg emergence to the onset of hind leg emergence); however, it did not show a significant effect on tadpole survival rates in Phases 1 and 2 of this stage . A salinity level of up to 5% showed no significant effect on the growth performance but caused a significant reduction in the survival rates of the tadpoles during this stage. We recommend that the artificial reproduction process of Thai frogs should be performed using salinities of <2%, with salinities of ≤2 and 3% being suitable for rearing tadpoles from the newly hatched to yolk sac exhaustion stage and from the yolk sac exhaustion to juvenile stage, respectively.

Research Article

Analysis of Migratory Catfish Production from Artisanal Fishing in the Middle Madeira Sub-Basin Using New Monitoring Methods, Southwestern Amazon

Studies on the production of Pimelodidae catfish in the Amazon are generally carried out in large fishing centers. However, the data referring to small-scale fisheries have gaps that can represent a risk to the activity. This study evaluated the volume produced and the revenue obtained from migratory catfish of the Pimelodidae family of commercial interest landed in Humaitá, Amazonas, Brazil, from May 2018 to April 2019. Daily monitoring was carried out with the Z-31 Fishermen’s Colony through questionnaires to fishermen for each vessel docked. The total production was 6013.93 kg, with 1,689 fish counted and 13 species. A total of 186 landings by 122 fishermen in 24 fishing sites characterized as rivers, lakes, and “igarapés” were evaluated. The average selling price was R$5.57/kg, and the highest volumes were obtained from July to September, mainly with gillnets, where the “Surubim” Pseudoplatystoma punticfer had the highest volume and revenue. Low productivity was verified in most localities, characterizing the fishing as artisanal. The lack of adequate conditions for storing and transporting fish, the local hydrological variations, and the presence of hydroelectric plants on the Madeira River are major factors limiting the fishing expansion in southern Amazonas.

Research Article

Transitional Strategies of Juvenile Green Sturgeon from a Riverine to a Brackish Water Environment

Information on habitat transitions is critical to understand whether efforts to manage the freshwater phase of juvenile green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) rearing habitats are feasible or beneficial. We implanted microacoustic transmitters in naturally produced age-0 juvenile green sturgeon in the Sacramento River to evaluate residency, general spatial distribution, movement rates, and downstream migration patterns over 300 river kilometers. Furthermore, we investigated whether changes in three environmental variables (discharge, turbidity, and water temperature) were associated with the beginning of movements resulting in the transition from riverine to brackish waters during their outmigration to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Estuary. We captured 183 juvenile green sturgeon by trawl of which 88 were implanted with microacoustic tags. An additional 10 individuals were collected and tagged from the Red Bluff Diversion Dam rotary-screw traps. Linear mixed models showed that individuals caught by trawl had longer upper river residence times, post-tagging, than those caught by trap. Intergate velocity models showed that trap-caught individuals relocated at higher upper river reach velocities than trawl-caught fish, but there were no differences between trap- and trawl-caught fish within the middle or lower reach. Detections showed that juvenile green sturgeon began the downstream transition to brackish water habitat when discharge and turbidity increased. Temperature was not found to significantly influence the initiation of downstream migration. Both continuous and stepped downstream migration patterns were observed in each of the four cohorts, with smaller individuals being more likely to exhibit stepped migration. These data provide information that was previously unknown about the life history of the southern distinct population segment of the North American green sturgeon and can be utilized to assist with water resource management and recovery of this threatened fish species.

Research Article

The Length-Weight Relationships of Twelve Fish Species from the Heishui River, China

Length-weight relationships are presented for twelve fish species collected at 22 sampling points in the Heishui River, a priority tributary for fish conservation in the mainstream of the Baihetan Reservoir area, China. A combination of gill nets was used for sampling over a period between November 2018 and May 2021. The gill nets consisted of 12 nets per point with dimensions of 20 × 2 m (length and width), mesh size ranging from 20 to 80 mm, and soaking depth ranging from 40 to 160 cm. In addition, fixed gill nets were employed, with 10 nets per point having dimensions of 10 to 30 m in length and 1.5 to 2.5 m in width. The mesh size of these fixed gill nets was 10, 15, or 20 mm. This study presents the length-weight relationships of twelve species for the first time in the Heishui River Basin, including the new maximum body length of Pseudorasbora parva (Temminck and Schlegel, 1846). The slope () values for the assessed species ranged from 2.5 to 3.5. All the estimated relationships are highly significant () with a high coefficient of determination ranging from 0.9574 to 0.9997. It is expected that the results obtained from this study will contribute to filling the knowledge gap in this area and also assist fisheries scientists in future assessment studies.

Journal of Applied Ichthyology
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore2.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.360
Impact Factor0.9
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