Journal of Applied Ichthyology
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Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore2.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.360
Impact Factor0.9

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 Journal profile

Journal of Applied Ichthyology publishes original research and review articles on applied ichthyology, aquaculture, and marine fisheries, including management of fisheries resources, fisheries ecology, fish health and pathology.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Professor Gouranga Biswas is a Senior Scientist at ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education. His research focuses on brackish water aquaculture, integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, species and system diversification, and fish and shellfish immunology.

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Research Article

Effects of Salinity on the Egg Fertilization, Hatching, and Tadpole Growth and Survival Rates of the Thailand Frog (Rana tigerina Dubois, 1981)

We studied the effects of salinity on the egg fertilization, hatching, and tadpole growth and survival rates of the Thailand frog (Rana tigerina Dubois, 1981), an introduced species that is commonly cultured in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Salinity levels of 2, 6, and 4% significantly affected the fertilization and hatching rates of the eggs, as well as the tadpole survival rates from the newly hatched to yolk sac exhaustion stages, respectively . Notably, during the stage from yolk sac exhaustion to juvenile tadpole, a salinity of 3% resulted in an increase in the final weight of the tadpoles throughout the stage and a significant increase in Phase 1 (the tadpole stage from yolk sac exhaustion to the onset of foreleg emergence) and Phase 2 (the tadpole stage from the onset of foreleg emergence to the onset of hind leg emergence); however, it did not show a significant effect on tadpole survival rates in Phases 1 and 2 of this stage . A salinity level of up to 5% showed no significant effect on the growth performance but caused a significant reduction in the survival rates of the tadpoles during this stage. We recommend that the artificial reproduction process of Thai frogs should be performed using salinities of <2%, with salinities of ≤2 and 3% being suitable for rearing tadpoles from the newly hatched to yolk sac exhaustion stage and from the yolk sac exhaustion to juvenile stage, respectively.

Research Article

Analysis of Migratory Catfish Production from Artisanal Fishing in the Middle Madeira Sub-Basin Using New Monitoring Methods, Southwestern Amazon

Studies on the production of Pimelodidae catfish in the Amazon are generally carried out in large fishing centers. However, the data referring to small-scale fisheries have gaps that can represent a risk to the activity. This study evaluated the volume produced and the revenue obtained from migratory catfish of the Pimelodidae family of commercial interest landed in Humaitá, Amazonas, Brazil, from May 2018 to April 2019. Daily monitoring was carried out with the Z-31 Fishermen’s Colony through questionnaires to fishermen for each vessel docked. The total production was 6013.93 kg, with 1,689 fish counted and 13 species. A total of 186 landings by 122 fishermen in 24 fishing sites characterized as rivers, lakes, and “igarapés” were evaluated. The average selling price was R$5.57/kg, and the highest volumes were obtained from July to September, mainly with gillnets, where the “Surubim” Pseudoplatystoma punticfer had the highest volume and revenue. Low productivity was verified in most localities, characterizing the fishing as artisanal. The lack of adequate conditions for storing and transporting fish, the local hydrological variations, and the presence of hydroelectric plants on the Madeira River are major factors limiting the fishing expansion in southern Amazonas.

Research Article

Transitional Strategies of Juvenile Green Sturgeon from a Riverine to a Brackish Water Environment

Information on habitat transitions is critical to understand whether efforts to manage the freshwater phase of juvenile green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) rearing habitats are feasible or beneficial. We implanted microacoustic transmitters in naturally produced age-0 juvenile green sturgeon in the Sacramento River to evaluate residency, general spatial distribution, movement rates, and downstream migration patterns over 300 river kilometers. Furthermore, we investigated whether changes in three environmental variables (discharge, turbidity, and water temperature) were associated with the beginning of movements resulting in the transition from riverine to brackish waters during their outmigration to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Estuary. We captured 183 juvenile green sturgeon by trawl of which 88 were implanted with microacoustic tags. An additional 10 individuals were collected and tagged from the Red Bluff Diversion Dam rotary-screw traps. Linear mixed models showed that individuals caught by trawl had longer upper river residence times, post-tagging, than those caught by trap. Intergate velocity models showed that trap-caught individuals relocated at higher upper river reach velocities than trawl-caught fish, but there were no differences between trap- and trawl-caught fish within the middle or lower reach. Detections showed that juvenile green sturgeon began the downstream transition to brackish water habitat when discharge and turbidity increased. Temperature was not found to significantly influence the initiation of downstream migration. Both continuous and stepped downstream migration patterns were observed in each of the four cohorts, with smaller individuals being more likely to exhibit stepped migration. These data provide information that was previously unknown about the life history of the southern distinct population segment of the North American green sturgeon and can be utilized to assist with water resource management and recovery of this threatened fish species.

Research Article

The Length-Weight Relationships of Twelve Fish Species from the Heishui River, China

Length-weight relationships are presented for twelve fish species collected at 22 sampling points in the Heishui River, a priority tributary for fish conservation in the mainstream of the Baihetan Reservoir area, China. A combination of gill nets was used for sampling over a period between November 2018 and May 2021. The gill nets consisted of 12 nets per point with dimensions of 20 × 2 m (length and width), mesh size ranging from 20 to 80 mm, and soaking depth ranging from 40 to 160 cm. In addition, fixed gill nets were employed, with 10 nets per point having dimensions of 10 to 30 m in length and 1.5 to 2.5 m in width. The mesh size of these fixed gill nets was 10, 15, or 20 mm. This study presents the length-weight relationships of twelve species for the first time in the Heishui River Basin, including the new maximum body length of Pseudorasbora parva (Temminck and Schlegel, 1846). The slope () values for the assessed species ranged from 2.5 to 3.5. All the estimated relationships are highly significant () with a high coefficient of determination ranging from 0.9574 to 0.9997. It is expected that the results obtained from this study will contribute to filling the knowledge gap in this area and also assist fisheries scientists in future assessment studies.

Research Article

Stock Evaluation of the Euryhaline Cichlid, Etroplus suratensis (Bloch, 1790), from Significant Brackish and Freshwater Regions of India

The present study evaluates stocks of Etroplus suratensis concerning length-weight relationships (LWRs), condition factor (K), and truss analysis from different habitats, viz., West Bengal (freshwater hatchery), Gujarat (brackish water grow-out pond), and Odisha (Chilika lagoon) in India. All the stocks were collected using gill nets with various mesh sizes of 20–50 mm and cast nets with mesh size of 15 mm from February 2021 to September 2021. The total length (L), weight (W), and digital pictures were taken for LWRs and principle component analysis (PCA). The total length (L) and total weight (W) were measured to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.01 gm, respectively, followed by regression analysis. The values of parameters “b” in the LWRs equation were estimated within the range of 2.50–3.82 and intercept “a” values (0.235–0.779) and “K” (1.07–3.37), respectively, for all different habitats and ecosystems with significant correlation values ( ≥ 0.85). In truss morphometric analysis, principal component 1 (PC1) contributed the highest (93.1%) and principal component 2 (PC2) contributed 4.6% to the size and shape variation amongst the stocks from different habitats and ecosystems. The scatter plot analysis and canonical variate analysis (CVA) have shown that the Gujarat and West Bengal stocks are closely placed and separated from the Chilika-Odisha stock. Similar variations were also observed in the ANOSIM boxplot analysis, where Chilika-Odisha stock scored higher than the other two stocks. Since data available regarding LWRs and truss morphometry studies of E. suratensis from different habitats are limited, the present study will provide a clear insight into the differentiation of E. suratensis stocks from different habitats in India. The overall findings of the present study could be utilized for the conservation and sustainable management of E. suratensis.

Research Article

Investigating the Fish Assemblages of the Neosho River System

Barrier presence in river systems has been demonstrated to impair fish assemblages. Low head dams specifically are frequently occurring barriers in riverine environments. Well-supported impacts of these structures on fishes include diminished movement, reproduction, and habitat availability. Longitudinal patterns in riverine fish assemblages have long been researched to ascertain dynamics and display interactions. The need for research becomes more critical when factoring in impacts of barriers and detrimental invasive species. Knowledge of fish assemblages can inform fisheries biologists and aid in improved management practices for recreational and ecologically important species, as well as invasive species. The Neosho River system in Kansas has 14 barriers present. Little fisheries sampling has been done in the Kansas portion of this river system from the John Redmond Dam to the Oklahoma border; therefore, sampling was conducted to inform questions posed about the fish assemblages. We sought to document the fish assemblages of the system in Kansas and examine for assemblage composition distinctions by geographic region along a longitudinal gradient. The fish assemblage dataset from this research generated a wealth of knowledge on sportfish infiltration from reservoirs, imperiled fishes, and apparent impacts from low-head dams. Information from this study will aid in future management and direct new research investigating imperiled fishes.

Journal of Applied Ichthyology
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore2.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.360
Impact Factor0.9
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