Table of Contents
Journal of Animals
Volume 2014, Article ID 938327, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/938327
Research Article

Understanding the Behavior of Domestic Emus: A Means to Improve Their Management and Welfare—Major Behaviors and Activity Time Budgets of Adult Emus

1Southern Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota, Waseca, MN 56093, USA
2Avian Research Centre, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
3Animal Science Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA

Received 22 August 2014; Revised 29 September 2014; Accepted 14 October 2014; Published 5 November 2014

Academic Editor: Tetsuya Matsuura

Copyright © 2014 Deepa G. Menon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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