Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2013, Article ID 185048, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/185048
Research Article

Out on the Land: Income, Subsistence Activities, and Food Sharing Networks in Nain, Labrador

1Department of Anthropology, John Jay College, City University of New York, 524 West 59th Street, New York, NY 10019, USA
2Doctoral Program in Anthropology, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA
3Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, John Jay College, City University of New York, 524 West 59th Street, New York, NY 10019, USA
4Culture and Mental Health Research Unit, 4333 Chemin de la Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E4
5Doctoral Program in Criminal Justice, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 13 December 2012; Accepted 17 January 2013

Academic Editor: Santos Alonso

Copyright © 2013 Kirk Dombrowski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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