Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2014, Article ID 750240, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/750240
Review Article

Traditional Birth Attendants and Policy Ambivalence in Zimbabwe

Sociology Department, University of Zimbabwe, P.O. Box MP 167, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe

Received 20 September 2013; Revised 23 December 2013; Accepted 24 December 2013; Published 7 May 2014

Academic Editor: Kaushik Bose

Copyright © 2014 Naume Zorodzai Choguya. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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