Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9479051, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9479051
Research Article

Purple Staining of Archaeological Human Bone: An Investigation of Probable Cause and Implications for Other Tissues and Artifacts

Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY, UK

Received 6 January 2016; Accepted 3 May 2016

Academic Editor: Hugo Cardoso

Copyright © 2016 Garrard Cole and Tony Waldron. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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