Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2017, Article ID 4387125, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4387125
Research Article

Shifting from Village-Based Networks to Locally Generated Networks: Undocumented Mexican Agricultural Workers Who Use/Used Hard Drugs

School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Keith V. Bletzer; ude.usa@reztelb.htiek

Received 26 July 2016; Accepted 1 February 2017; Published 28 February 2017

Academic Editor: Kaushik Bose

Copyright © 2017 Keith V. Bletzer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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