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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 308407, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/308407
Research Article

Long-Term Changes in Physical Activity Following a One-Year Home-Based Physical Activity Counseling Program in Older Adults with Multiple Morbidities

1Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
2Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
3Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
4Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
5Neurodiagnostic Center, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
6Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
8Health Services Research and Development Service, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
9Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA

Received 25 August 2010; Revised 16 November 2010; Accepted 6 December 2010

Academic Editor: Iris Reuter

Copyright © 2011 Katherine S. Hall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study assessed the sustained effect of a physical activity (PA) counseling intervention on PA one year after intervention, predictors of sustained PA participation, and three classes of post-intervention PA trajectories (improvers, maintainers, and decliners) in 238 older Veterans. Declines in minutes of PA from 12 to 24 months were observed for both the treatment and control arms of the study. PA at 12 months was the strongest predictor of post-intervention changes in PA. To our surprise, those who took up the intervention and increased PA levels the most, had significant declines in post-intervention PA. Analysis of the three post-intervention PA trajectories demonstrated that the maintenance group actually reflected a group of nonresponders to the intervention who had more comorbidities, lower self-efficacy, and worse physical function than the improvers or decliners. Results suggest that behavioral counseling/support must be ongoing to promote maintenance. Strategies to promote PA appropriately to subgroups of individuals are needed.