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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 820903, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/820903
Review Article

Therapeutic Approaches to Delay the Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

Department of Basic Sciences, Neuroscience, The Commonwealth Medical College, Tobin Hall, 501 Madison Avenue, Scranton, PA 18510, USA

Received 26 October 2010; Accepted 10 January 2011

Academic Editor: Christiaan Leeuwenburgh

Copyright © 2011 Raj Kumar and Hani Atamna. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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