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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 140968, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/140968
Clinical Study

Plantar Temperature Response to Walking in Diabetes with and without Acute Charcot: The Charcot Activity Response Test

1Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA
2Arizona Center on Aging, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
3University of Michigan, Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
4Diabetic Foot and Wound Center, Department of Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar

Received 1 May 2012; Accepted 25 June 2012

Academic Editor: Neil D. Reeves

Copyright © 2012 Bijan Najafi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Asymmetric plantar temperature differences secondary to inflammation is a hallmark for the diagnosis and treatment response of Charcot foot syndrome. However, little attention has been given to temperature response to activity. We examined dynamic changes in plantar temperature (PT) as a function of graduated walking activity to quantify thermal responses during the first 200 steps. Methods. Fifteen individuals with Acute Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) and 17 non-CN participants with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were recruited. All participants walked for two predefined paths of 50 and 150 steps. A thermal image was acquired at baseline after acclimatization and immediately after each walking trial. The PT response as a function of number of steps was examined using a validated wearable sensor technology. The hot spot temperature was identified by the 95th percentile of measured temperature at each anatomical region (hind/mid/forefoot). Results. During initial activity, the PT was reduced in all participants, but the temperature drop for the nonaffected foot was 1.9 times greater than the affected side in CN group ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 4 ). Interestingly, the PT in CN was sharply increased after 50 steps for both feet, while no difference was observed in non-CN between 50 and 200 steps. Conclusions. The variability in thermal response to the graduated walking activity between Charcot and non-Charcot feet warrants future investigation to provide further insight into the correlation between thermal response and ulcer/Charcot development. This stress test may be helpful to differentiate CN and its response to treatment earlier in its course.