Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 360254, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/360254
Research Article

Is Collective Efficacy Age Graded? The Development and Evaluation of a New Measure of Collective Efficacy for Older Adults

1Center on the Demography and Economics of Aging, NORC and the University of Chicago, 1155 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
2Departments of Sociology and Health Studies, University of Chicago, 1155 E. 60th Street, Rm 238, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
3Department of Sociology, Ohio State University, 214 Townshend Hall, 1885 Neil Avenue Mall, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Received 16 May 2011; Revised 7 October 2011; Accepted 27 November 2011

Academic Editor: Lindy Clemson

Copyright © 2012 Adena M. Galinsky et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. C. Cannuscio, J. Block, and I. Kawachi, “Social capital and successful aging: the role of senior housing,” Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 139, no. 5, pp. 395–399, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. J. H. Oh, “Social bonds and the migration intentions of elderly urban residents: the mediating effects of residential satisfaction,” Population Research and Policy Review, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 127–146, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. World Health Organization, Global Age-Friendy Cities: A Guide, WHO Press, Geneva, Switzerland, 2007.
  4. C. R. Browning and K. A. Cagney, “Neighborhood structural disadvantage, collective efficacy, and self-rated physical health in an urban setting,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 383–399, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. K. A. Cagney and C. R. Browning, “Exploring neighborhood-level variation in asthma and other respiratory diseases: the contribution of neighborhood social context,” Journal of General Internal Medicine, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 229–236, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. I. Kawachi and L. F. Berkman, “Social cohesion, social capital, and health,” in Social Epidemiology, L. F. Berkman and I. Kawachi, Eds., Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  7. A. Nazmi, A. Diez Roux, N. Ranjit, T. E. Seeman, and N. S. Jenny, “Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of neighborhood characteristics with inflammatory markers: findings from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis,” Health and Place, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 1104–1112, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. L. Balfour and G. J. Kaplan, “Neighborhood environment and loss of physical function in older adults: evidence from the Alameda County Study,” American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 155, no. 6, pp. 507–515, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. C. E. Ross, “Walking, exercising, and smoking: does neighborhood matter?” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 265–274, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. Wen and N. A. Christakis, “Neighborhood effects on posthospitalization mortality: a population-based cohort study of the elderly in Chicago,” Health Services Research, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 1108–1127, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. E. Litwak and C. F. Longino, “Migration patterns among the elderly: a developmental perspective,” Gerontologist, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 266–272, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. D. E. Bradley, “Litwak and Longino's developmental model of later-life migration: evidence from the American community survey, 2005–2007,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 141–158, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. J. F. Sergeant, D. J. Ekerdt, and R. K. Chapin, “Older adults' expectations to move: do they predict actual community-based or nursing facility moves within 2 years?” Journal of Aging and Health, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1029–1053, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. K. J. Stoeckel and F. Porell, “Do older adults anticipate relocating? The relationship between housing relocation expectations and falls,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 231–250, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. F. Earls and S. L. Buka, “Project on human development in chicago neighborhoods,” Technical Report, National Institute of Justice, Rockville, Md, USA, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  16. M. P. Lawton, “The Philadelphia geriatric center morale scale: a revision,” Journals of Gerontology, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 85–89, 1975. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. B. L. Neugarten, R. J. Havighurst, and S. S. Tobin, “The measurement of life satisfaction,” Journals of Gerontology, vol. 16, pp. 134–143, 1961. View at Google Scholar
  18. D. L. Segal, A. June, M. Payne, F. L. Coolidge, and B. Yochim, “Development and initial validation of a self-report assessment tool for anxiety among older adults: the Geriatric Anxiety Scale,” Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 709–714, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. A. Yesavage, T. L. Brink, T. L. Rose et al., “Development and validation of a geriatric depression screening scale: a preliminary report,” Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 37–49, 1983. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  20. L. Halvorsrud and M. Kalfoss, “The conceptualization and measurement of quality of life in older adults: a review of empirical studies published during 1994–2006,” European Journal of Ageing, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 229–246, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. R. Fitzpatrick, C. Davey, M. J. Buxton, and D. R. Jones, “Evaluating patient-based outcome measures for use in clinical trials: a review,” Health Technology Assessment, vol. 2, no. 14, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. C. A. McHorney, “Measuring and monitoring general health status in elderly persons: practical and methodological issues in using the SF-36 health survey,” Gerontologist, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 571–583, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. R. J. Sampson, S. W. Raudenbush, and F. Earls, “Neighborhoods and violent crime: a multilevel study of collective efficacy,” Science, vol. 277, no. 5328, pp. 918–924, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. S. W. Raudenbush and R. J. Sampson, “Ecometrics: toward a science of assessing ecological settings, with application to the systematic social observation of neighborhoods,” Sociological Methodology, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 1–41, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. K. A. Cagney, T. A. Glass, K. A. Skarupski, L. L. Barnes, B. S. Schwartz, and C. F. Mendes de Leon, “Neighborhood-level cohesion and disorder: measurement and validation in two older adult urban populations,” Journals of Gerontology B, vol. 64, no. 3, pp. 415–424, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. D. T. Lau, K. G. Scandrett, M. Jarzebowski, K. Holman, and L. Emanuel, “Health-related safety: a framework to address barriers to aging in place,” Gerontologist, vol. 47, no. 6, pp. 830–837, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. E. H. Erikson and J. M. Erikson, The Life Cycle Completed, Norton, New York, NY, USA, 1997.
  28. C. D. Ryff, “Psychological well-being in adult life,” Current Directions in Psychological Science, vol. 4, pp. 99–104, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  29. C.D. Ryff, “Happiness is everything, or is it? Explorations on the meaning of psychological well-being,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 57, no. 6, pp. 1069–1081, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  30. L. P. Fried, C. M. Tangen, J. Walston et al., “Frailty in older adults: evidence for a phenotype,” Journals of Gerontology, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. M146–M156, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  31. K. Erikson, “Reflections on generativity and society: a sociologist's perspective,” in The Generative Society: Caring for Future Generations, E. de St. Aubin, D. P. McAdams, and T. Kim, Eds., pp. 51–61, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, USA, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  32. E. Pfeiffer, “Psychopathology and social pathology,” in Handbook of the Psychology of Aging, J. E. Birren and K. W. Schaie, Eds., pp. 650–671, Academic Press, New York, NY, USA, 1977. View at Google Scholar
  33. C. D. Ryff, “Beyond Ponce de Leon and life satisfaction: new directions in quest of successful ageing,” International Journal of Behavioral Development, vol. 12, p. 55, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  34. B. Cornwell, L. P. Schumm, E. O. Laumann, and J. Graber, “Social networks in the nshap study: rationale, measurement, and preliminary findings,” Journals of Gerontology B, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. I47–I55, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. D. Dannefer, “Cumulative advantage/disadvantage and the life course: cross-fertilizing age and social science theory,” Journals of Gerontology B, vol. 58, supplement 6, pp. S327–S337, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. G. H. Elder, M. K. Johnson, and R. Crosnoe, “The emergence and development of life course theory,” in Handbook of the Life Course, J. T. Mortimer and M. J. Shanahan, Eds., pp. 3–22, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  37. S. A. Robert, K. A. Cagney, and M. Weden, “A life course approach to the study of neighborhoods and health,” in Handbook of Medical Sociology, C. Bird, P. Conrad, and A. M. Fremont, Eds., Vanderbilt University Press, Nashville, Tenn, USA, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  38. T. L. Gruenewald, T. E. Seeman, A. S. Karlamangla, and C. A. Sarkisian, “Allostatic load and frailty in older adults,” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 57, no. 9, pp. 1525–1531, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. C. O. Weiss, “Frailty and chronic diseases in older adults,” Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 39–52, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. R. O. Hansson and B. N. Carpenter, Relationships in Old Age: Coping with the Challenge of Transition, Guilford Press, New York, NY, USA, 1994.
  41. J. E. Lansford, A. M. Sherman, and T. C. Antonucci, “Satisfaction with social networks: an examination of socioemotional selectivity theory across cohorts,” Psychology and Aging, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 544–552, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. K. E. Campbell and B. A. Lee, “Sources of personal neighbor networks: social integration, need, or time?” Social Forces, vol. 70, pp. 77–100, 1992. View at Google Scholar
  43. M. H. Cantor, “Life space and the social support system of the inner city elderly of New York,” Gerontologist, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 23–27, 1975. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. R. A. R. Gurung, S. E. Taylor, and T. E. Seeman, “Accounting for changes in social support among married older adults: insights from the MacArthur studies of successful aging,” Psychology and Aging, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 487–496, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. M. W. Riley and J. W. Riley, “Age integration: conceptual and historical background,” Gerontologist, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 266–270, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. G. O. Hagestad, “Towards a society for all ages: new thinking, new language, new conversations,” United Nations Bulletin on Aging, no. 2-3, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  47. G. O. Hagestad and D. Dannefer, “Concepts and theories of aging: beyond microfication in social science approaches,” in Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences, R. H. Binstock and L. K. George, Eds., pp. 3–21, Academic Press, New York, NY, USA, 5th edition, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  48. P. Uhlenberg, “Integration of old and young,” Gerontologist, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 276–279, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. G. O. Hagestad and P. Uhlenberg, “The social separation of old and young: a root of ageism,” Journal of Social Issues, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 343–360, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. E. Janse, “Processing of fast speech by elderly listeners,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 125, no. 4, pp. 2361–2373, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. X. Z. Liu and D. Yan, “Ageing and hearing loss,” Journal of Pathology, vol. 211, no. 2, pp. 188–197, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. N. Wild-Wall and M. Falkenstein, “Age-dependent impairment of auditory processing under spatially focused and divided attention: an electrophysiological study,” Biological Psychology, vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 27–36, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. M. W. Riley and J. W. Riley, “Age integration and the lives of older people,” Gerontologist, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 110–115, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. M. W. Riley, “Successful aging,” The Gerontologist, vol. 38, no. 2, p. 151, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. T. L. Gruenewald, A. S. Karlamangla, G. A. Greendale, B. H. Singer, and T. E. Seeman, “Increased mortality risk in older adults with persistently low or declining feelings of usefulness to others,” Journal of Aging and Health, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 398–425, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. B. Levy and M. R. Banaji, “Implicit ageism,” in Ageism: Stereotyping and Prejudice Against Older Persons, T. Nelson, Ed., pp. 49–75, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  57. P. F. Adams, G. E. Hendershot, and M. A. Marano, “Current estimates from the national health interview survey, United States, 1996,” Tech. Rep. 200, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Md, USA, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  58. L. P. Fried, L. Ferrucci, J. Darer, J. D. Williamson, and G. Anderson, “Untangling the concepts of disability, frailty, and comorbidity: implications for improved targeting and care,” Journals of Gerontology, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 255–263, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. L. P. Fried, C. M. Tangen, J. Walston et al., “Frailty in older adults: evidence for a phenotype,” Journals of Gerontology, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. M146–M156, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  60. L. Ferrucci, J. M. Guralnik, S. Studenski, L. P. Fried, G. B. Cutler, and J. D. Walston, “Designing randomized, controlled trials aimed at preventing or delaying functional decline and disability in frail, older persons: a consensus report,” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 625–634, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  61. C. R. Clark, I. Kawachi, L. Ryan, K. Ertel, M. E. Fay, and L. F. Berkman, “Perceived neighborhood safety and incident mobility disability among elders: the hazards of poverty,” BMC Public Health, vol. 9, article 162, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. J. W. Reich, A. J. Zautra, and J. Hill, “Activity, event transactions, and quality of life in older adults,” Psychology and Aging, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 116–124, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  63. E. Wargo, N. English, and A. Kuby, NOAH—Neighborhood, Organization, Aging and Health, NORC/University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill, USA, 2008.
  64. R. Curtin, S. Presser, and E. Singer, “Changes in telephone survey nonresponse over the past quarter century,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 87–98, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. M. Tonry, L. E. Ohlin, and D. P. Farrington, “Human development and criminal behavior: new ways of advancing knowledge,” in Research in Criminology, A. Blumstein and D. P. Farrington, Eds., Springer, New York, NY, USA, 1991. View at Google Scholar
  66. M. E. Hughes, L. J. Waite, L. C. Hawkley, and J. T. Cacioppo, “A short scale for measuring loneliness in large surveys: results from two population-based studies,” Research on Aging, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 655–672, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. A. M. Kempf and P. L. Remington, “New challenges for telephone survey research in the twenty-first century,” Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 28, pp. 113–126, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  68. A. L. Holbrook, M. C. Green, and J. A. Krosnick, “Telephone versus face-to-face interviewing of national probability samples with long questionnaires: comparisons of respondent satisficing and social desirability response bias,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 67, no. 1, pp. 79–125, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  69. A. R. Herzog and W. L. Rodgers, “Interviewing older adults: mode comparison using data from a face-to-face survey and a telephone resurvey,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 84–99, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  70. D. O. Kaldenberg, H. F. Koenig, and B. W. Becker, “Mail survey response rate patterns in a population of the elderly: does response deteriorate with age?” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 68–76, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus