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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 427109, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/427109
Research Article

Could Questions on Activities of Daily Living Estimate Grip Strength of Older Adults Living Independently in the Community?

1Health and Social Services Centre, University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1H 4C4
2School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1H 5N4
3Centre de Réadaptation Estrie, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1G 1B1
4Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1H 5N4
5Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada

Received 14 October 2011; Accepted 13 January 2012

Academic Editor: Kee Lee Chou

Copyright © 2012 Jessica Simard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify questions that could estimate grip strength. Twenty-six questions about the degree of perceived difficulty performing manual tasks as well as two questions concerning self-rated grip strength were developed and completed by 123 community-dwelling older adults, followed by grip strength measurements using a Martin vigorimeter. Multiple regression analyses with all of the participants revealed that the question about the difficulty of opening a jar (question 4) was most associated with grip strength. When analyses were done by gender, the same question showed the best correlation for women, whereas the one for men was self-rated grip strength compared with people the same age (question 28). For the women, age and question 4 together explained 54% of the variance in their grip strength and for the men, age and question 28 explained 46%. Further studies are needed to identify other information that could help to better estimate grip strength for use in epidemiological surveys.