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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 8514582, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8514582
Research Article

Measuring Fluid Intelligence in Healthy Older Adults

1Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4
2Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4

Correspondence should be addressed to Mohammed K. Shakeel; ac.yraglacu@lihtalak.demmahom

Received 25 October 2016; Revised 30 November 2016; Accepted 12 January 2017; Published 30 January 2017

Academic Editor: Elke Bromberg

Copyright © 2017 Mohammed K. Shakeel and Vina M. Goghari. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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