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Journal of Botany
Volume 2009, Article ID 278324, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/278324
Research Article

Nucleotide-Dependent Reprogramming of mRNAs Encoding Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase and Lipoxygenase in Relation to the Fat Contents of Peanut

CARC Laboratories, Prairie View A&M University, P.O. Box 519-2008, Prairie View, TX 77446, USA

Received 18 February 2009; Revised 30 June 2009; Accepted 22 October 2009

Academic Editor: Bala Rathinasabapathi

Copyright © 2009 G. O. Osuji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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