Table of Contents
Journal of Botany
Volume 2010, Article ID 382732, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/382732
Review Article

Recent Insights into Mechanisms of Genome Size Change in Plants

Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA

Received 4 February 2010; Accepted 19 March 2010

Academic Editor: Ilia Judith Leitch

Copyright © 2010 Corrinne E. Grover and Jonathan F. Wendel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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