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Journal of Botany
Volume 2011, Article ID 104172, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/104172
Review Article

Genome Diversity in Maize

1DuPont Agricultural Biotechnology, Experimental Station, P.O. Box 80353, Wilmington, DE 19880-0353, USA
2Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., A DuPont Company, 7300 NW 62nd Avenue, P.O. Box 1004, Johnston, IA 50131-1004, USA

Received 27 April 2011; Accepted 7 July 2011

Academic Editor: Simon Hiscock

Copyright © 2011 Victor Llaca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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