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Journal of Botany
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 369572, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/369572
Review Article

Phytotoxicity by Lead as Heavy Metal Focus on Oxidative Stress

1Biology Department, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2MAP-BioPlant, Biology Department, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal

Received 14 February 2012; Accepted 13 April 2012

Academic Editor: Conceição Santos

Copyright © 2012 Sónia Pinho and Bruno Ladeiro. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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