Table of Contents
Journal of Botany
Volume 2014, Article ID 573415, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/573415
Research Article

Morphological Responses Explain Tolerance of the Bamboo Yushania microphylla to Grazing

1Renewable Natural Resources Research and Development Center, Ministry of Agriculture, Bumthang, Bhutan
2Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Ecology, BOKU University, Vienna, Austria

Received 5 June 2014; Accepted 9 August 2014; Published 19 August 2014

Academic Editor: William K. Smith

Copyright © 2014 Kesang Wangchuk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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