Table of Contents
Journal of Botany
Volume 2015, Article ID 167186, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/167186
Research Article

Purpose of Introduction as a Predictor of Invasiveness among Introduced Shrubs in Rwanda

College of Science and Technology, University of Rwanda, Huye Campus, P.O. Box 117, Butare, Rwanda

Received 19 June 2014; Revised 9 January 2015; Accepted 12 January 2015

Academic Editor: Curtis C. Daehler

Copyright © 2015 Jean Leonard Seburanga. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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