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Journal of Biomedical Education
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 469351, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/469351
Review Article

Learner-Directed Nutrition Content for Medical Schools to Meet LCME Standards

1Department of Research, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA
2Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City College of New York, NY, USA
3Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Received 22 October 2014; Accepted 21 December 2014

Academic Editor: Balakrishnan Nair

Copyright © 2015 Lisa A. Hark et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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