Table of Contents
Journal of Biophysics
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 423838, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/423838
Review Article

The Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Alternating Magnetic Field on the Behavior of Animals in the Presence of the Geomagnetic Field

1Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya 3, Pushchino, Moscow 142290, Russia
2Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 21 October 2015; Accepted 9 December 2015

Academic Editor: Jianwei Shuai

Copyright © 2015 Natalia A. Belova and Daniel Acosta-Avalos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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