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Journal of Combustion
Volume 2011, Article ID 572452, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/572452
Research Article

Integrating Fire Behavior Models and Geospatial Analysis for Wildland Fire Risk Assessment and Fuel Management Planning

1Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Center, Pacific Northwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 3160 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754, USA
2Fire Sciences Laboratory, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 5775 Highway 10 West, Missoula, MT 59808, USA

Received 1 January 2011; Revised 8 June 2011; Accepted 24 June 2011

Academic Editor: William E. Mell

Copyright © 2011 Alan A. Ager et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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