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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 540563, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/540563
Research Article

Genetic Influences on Physiological and Subjective Responses to an Aerobic Exercise Session among Sedentary Adults

1Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado at Boulder, 345 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0345, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, MSC03 2220, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA

Received 16 March 2012; Revised 1 June 2012; Accepted 5 June 2012

Academic Editor: Colleen M. McBride

Copyright © 2012 Hollis C. Karoly et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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