Table of Contents
Journal of Construction Engineering
Volume 2014, Article ID 502961, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/502961
Research Article

Perceptions on Barriers to the Use of Burnt Clay Bricks for Housing Construction

Department of Building Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Private Mail Bag, Kumasi, Ghana

Received 31 May 2014; Accepted 13 July 2014; Published 21 July 2014

Academic Editor: F. Pacheco-Torgal

Copyright © 2014 Bernard K. Baiden et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Burnt clay bricks can be readily manufactured in Ghana as all ten regions have significant clay deposits with the Ashanti region having the highest estimated deposit of 37.1 million metric tonnes. In recent times, burnt clay bricks have been regarded as old fashioned and replaced by other perceived modern walling units within Kumasi, the metropolitan capital of Ashanti Region, despite its availability, unique advantages (aesthetics, low maintenance cost, etc.), and structural and nonstructural properties. This study involved a questionnaire survey of 85 respondents made up of architects, brick manufacturing firms, and brick house owners or occupants in the Kumasi Metropolis of Ghana and sought to examine their perceptions on barriers to the use of burnt clay bricks for housing construction. The findings revealed that the key factors inhibiting the use of burnt clay bricks for housing construction are low material demand, excessive cost implications, inappropriate use in construction, noncompatibility of burnt clay bricks with other materials, unreliable production, and transportation problems. The findings however provide a platform for stakeholders to address the barriers to enable the extensive use of clay bricks in housing constructions.