Table of Contents
Journal of Construction Engineering
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1562750, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1562750
Research Article

Construction Practices Contributing to Rising Damp in Kumasi Metropolitan and Ejisu Municipal Assemblies in Ghana

1Construction Division, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Building and Road Research Institute (BRRI), Kumasi, Ghana
2Structures, Design and Planning Division, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Building and Road Research Institute (BRRI), Kumasi, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Richard Oduro Asamoah; moc.oohay@067haomasadrahcir

Received 2 March 2017; Revised 19 May 2017; Accepted 24 July 2017; Published 24 August 2017

Academic Editor: Eric Lui

Copyright © 2017 Richard Oduro Asamoah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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