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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 281341, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/281341
Research Article

Synthesis and Antifungal Studies of (2E)-N-Benzyl-N′-phenylbut-2-enediamide and (2E)-N,N′-Dibenzylbut-2-enediamide Analogues

1School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000, South Africa
2Department of Chemistry, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria 2222, Nigeria
3School of Biological Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000, South Africa

Received 4 April 2013; Revised 14 May 2013; Accepted 16 May 2013

Academic Editor: A. M. S. Silva

Copyright © 2013 Habila J. Dama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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