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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2016, Article ID 9806102, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9806102
Review Article

Chemically Diverse Secondary Metabolites from Davidia involucrata (Dove Tree)

1Key Laboratory of Plant Virology of Fujian Province, Institute of Plant Virology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002, China
2Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002, China

Received 28 July 2016; Accepted 26 September 2016

Academic Editor: Artur M. S. Silva

Copyright © 2016 Li-Yan Song et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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