Table of Contents
Journal of Climatology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 313917, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/313917
Research Article

Time Series Analysis: A New Methodology for Comparing the Temporal Variability of Air Temperature

1Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
2Tartu Observatory, 61602 Tõravere, Estonia

Received 15 May 2013; Accepted 25 September 2013

Academic Editors: E. Paoletti, A. Rutgersson, and A. P. Trishchenko

Copyright © 2013 Piia Post and Olavi Kärner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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