Table of Contents
Journal of Cancer Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 167576, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/167576
Review Article

Derailing the UPS of Protein Turnover in Cancer and other Human Diseases

1Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8 College Road, Singapore 169857
2Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubator, University of Florida, 12085 Research Drive, Alachua, FL 32615, USA

Received 27 March 2013; Revised 1 July 2013; Accepted 15 July 2013

Academic Editor: Jianming Ying

Copyright © 2013 Jit Kong Cheong and Stephen I-Hong Hsu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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