Table of Contents
Journal of Cancer Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 895019, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/895019
Review Article

Tumour Angiogenesis: A Growth Area—From John Hunter to Judah Folkman and Beyond

1Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK
2Department of Urology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Gwendolen Road, Leicester LE5 4PW, UK
3Department of Surgery University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Gwendolen Road, Leicester LE5 4PW, UK

Received 28 March 2013; Accepted 17 June 2013

Academic Editor: Kentaro Nakayama

Copyright © 2013 J. A. Stephenson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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