Table of Contents
Journal of Cancer Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 762716, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/762716
Research Article

Molecular Docking Study Characterization of Rare Flavonoids at the Nac-Binding Site of the First Bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4 BD1)

Department of Pharmacology, Amrita School of Pharmacy, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University, AIMS Health Sciences Campus, Kochi, Kerala 682041, India

Received 27 September 2014; Revised 13 February 2015; Accepted 13 February 2015

Academic Editor: Daizo Yoshida

Copyright © 2015 Karthik Dhananjayan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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