Table of Contents
Journal of Criminology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 401301, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/401301
Research Article

Predicting School Bullying Victimization: Focusing on Individual and School Environmental/Security Factors

1Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19595, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
2Illinois State University, USA
3University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
4Texas A&M International University, USA

Received 1 March 2013; Revised 29 April 2013; Accepted 18 June 2013

Academic Editor: John McCluskey

Copyright © 2013 Seokjin Jeong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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