Table of Contents
Journal of Criminology
Volume 2013, Article ID 780460, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/780460
Research Article

The Role of Bystander Perceptions and School Climate in Influencing Victims' Responses to Bullying: To Retaliate or Seek Support?

1Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 200 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
2Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 27 February 2013; Accepted 23 May 2013

Academic Editor: Byongook Moon

Copyright © 2013 Sarah Lindstrom Johnson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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