Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Drug Delivery
Volume 2011, Article ID 902403, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/902403
Review Article

Enhanced Transport Capabilities via Nanotechnologies: Impacting Bioefficacy, Controlled Release Strategies, and Novel Chaperones

1Microfluidics International Corporation, P.O. Box 9101, Newton, MA 02464, USA
2Chemical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 66, Room 305, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307, USA

Received 31 December 2010; Revised 22 February 2011; Accepted 23 February 2011

Academic Editor: Giorgia Pastorin

Copyright © 2011 Thomai Panagiotou and Robert J. Fisher. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. B. Rabinow, “Pharmacokinetics of nanosuspensions,” in Proceedings of the Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery Conference, Philadelphia, Pa, USA, 2005.
  2. B. E. Rabinow, “Nanosuspensions in drug delivery,” Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 785–796, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  3. E. Merisko-Liversidge, G. G. Liversidge, and E. R. Cooper, “Nanosizing: a formulation approach for poorly-water-soluble compounds,” European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 113–120, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. R. Saffie-Siebert, J. Ogden, and M. Parry-Billings, “Nanotechnology approaches to solving the problems of poorly water-soluble drugs,” Drug Discovery World, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 71–76, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. Microfluidicss Homepage, http://www.microfluidicscorp.com/.
  6. Elan: NanoCrystal(R)Technology, http://www.elandrugtechnologies.com/nanocrystal_technology.
  7. M. T. Stephan, J. J. Moon, S. H. Um, A. Bersthteyn, and D. J. Irvine, “Therapeutic cell engineering with surface-conjugated synthetic nanoparticles,” Nature Medicine, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 1035–1041, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  8. R. Kumar, R. Tyagi, V. S. Parmar et al., “Perfluorinated amphiphilic polymers as nano probes for imaging and delivery of therapeutics for cancer,” Polymer Preprints, vol. 45, p. 2, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  9. M. T. Miller, In vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of alternating copolymers for use as drug delivery vehicles, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2009.
  10. G. Liversidge, “Controlled release and nanotechnologies: recent advances and future opportunities,” Drug Development and Delivery, vol. 11, p. 1, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  11. T. Panagiotou, S. V. Mesite, and R. J. Fisher, “Production of norfloxacin nanosuspensions using microfluidics reaction technology through solvent/antisolvent crystallization,” Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 1761–1771, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. T. Panagiotou and R. Fisher, “Nano-particle formation via controlled crystallization: a “bottom-up” approach,” Chemical Engineering Progress, vol. 104, p. 33, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  13. T. Panagiotou, S. V. Mesite, J. M. Bernard, K. J. Chomistek, and R. J. Fisher, “Production of polymer nanosuspensions using Microfluidizer® processor based technologies,” in Proceedings of the Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show, pp. 688–691, June 2008. View at Scopus
  14. T. Panagiotou, S. Mesite, R. Fisher, and I. Gruverman, “Production of stable drug nanospensions using microfluidics reaction technology,” in Proceedings of the NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show, pp. 246–249, May 2007. View at Scopus
  15. A. Myerson, Handbook of Industrial Crystallization, Butterworth-Heinemann, Boston, Mass, USA, 2nd edition, 2002.
  16. S. Rohani, S. Horne, and K. Murthy, “Control of product quality in batch crystallization of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals—part 2: external control,” Organic Process Research and Development, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 873–883, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. K. J. Carpenter and W. M. L. Wood, “Industrial crystallization for fine chemicals,” Advanced Powder Technology, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 657–672, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. J. Baldyga and J. Bourne, Turbulent Mixing and Chemical Reactions, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA, 1999.
  19. W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 1998.
  20. C. E. Brennen, Cavitation and Bubble Dynamics, Oxford University Press, London, UK, 1995.
  21. K. D. Samant and L. O'Young, “Understanding crystallization and crystallizers,” Chemical Engineering Progress, vol. 102, no. 10, pp. 28–37, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. W. Genek, “Ask the experts: understanding crystallization,” 2008, http://www.aiche.org/cep/.
  23. J. Zhong, Z. Shen, Y. Yang, and J. Chen, “Preparation and characterization of uniform nanosized cephradine by combination of reactive precipitation and liquid anti-solvent precipitation under high gravity environment,” International Journal of Pharmaceutics, vol. 301, no. 1-2, pp. 286–293, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  24. J. Midler, “Crystallization method to improve crystal structure and size,” US Patent no. 5,314,506, 1994.
  25. J. Kipp, J. Wong, M. Doty, and C. Rebbeck, “Microprecipitation method for preparing submicrometer suspensions,” US Patent no. 6,869,617, 2001.
  26. T. Panagiotou, S. Mesite, and R. Fisher, “Production of crystalline nanoparticles using microfluidics reaction technology,” in Proceedings of the 17th International Symposium on Industrial Crystallization Maastricht, the Netherlands, 2008.
  27. A. J. Mahajan and D. J. Kirwan, “Micromixing effects in a two-impinging-jets precipitator,” AIChE Journal, vol. 42, no. 7, pp. 1801–1814, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. B. K. Johnson and R. K. Prud'homme, “Chemical processing and micromixing in confined impinging jets,” AIChE Journal, vol. 49, no. 9, pp. 2264–2282, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. A. J. Mahajan and D. J. Kirwan, “Rapid precipitation of biochemicals,” Journal of Physics D, vol. 26, no. 8 B, pp. B176–B180, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. R. Costello, “Tiny reactors aim for big role,” Chemical Processing, vol. 69, no. 12, pp. 14–19, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. A. J. Swiston, C. Cheng, S. H. Um, D. J. Irvine, R. E. Cohen, and M. F. Rubner, “Surface functionalization of living cells with multilayer patches,” Nano Letters, vol. 8, no. 12, pp. 4446–4453, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  32. A. J. Swiston, J. B. Gilbert, D. J. Irvine, R. E. Cohen, and M. F. Rubner, “Freely suspended cellular “backpacks” lead to cell aggregate self-assembly,” Biomacromolecules, vol. 11, no. 7, pp. 1826–1832, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  33. R. J. Fisher and R. A. Peattie, “Controlling tissue microenvironments: biomimetics, transport phenomena, and reacting systems,” Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology, vol. 103, pp. 1–73, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  34. A. M. Sokolnicki, R. J. Fisher, D. L. Kaplan, and T. P. Harrah, “Permeability studies with bacterial cellulose membranes,” Journal of Membrane Science, vol. 6793, pp. 1–13, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  35. K. E. Christodoulakis and M. Vamvakaki, “Amphoteric core-shell microgels: contraphilic two-compartment colloidal particles,” Langmuir, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 639–647, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  36. E. Stratakis, A. Mateescu, M. Barberoglou, M. Vamvakaki, C. Fotakis, and S. H. Anastasiadis, “From superhydrophobicity and water repellency to superhydrophilicity: smart polymer-functionalized surfaces,” Chemical Communications, vol. 46, no. 23, pp. 4136–4138, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  37. R. A. Peattie, D. B. Pike, B. Yu et al., “Effect of gelatin on heparin regulation of cytokine release from hyaluronan-based hydrogels,” Drug Delivery, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 389–397, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  38. R. A. Peattie, A. P. Nayate, M. A. Firpo, J. Shelby, R. J. Fisher, and G. D. Prestwich, “Stimulation of in vivo angiogenesis by cytokine-loaded hyaluronic acid hydrogel implants,” Biomaterials, vol. 25, no. 14, pp. 2789–2798, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  39. R. A. Peattie, A. P. Nayate, M. A. Firpo et al., “Stimulation of in vivo angiogenesis by cytokine-loaded hyaluronic acid hydrogel implants and potential gene expression mechanisms for new vessel growth,” in Proceedings of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 24th Annual Conference, pp. 873–874, October 2002. View at Scopus
  40. D. B. Pike, S. Cai, K. R. Pomraning et al., “Heparin-regulated release of growth factors in vitro and angiogenic response in vivo to implanted hyaluronan hydrogels containing VEGF and bFGF,” Biomaterials, vol. 27, no. 30, pp. 5242–5251, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  41. R. A. Peattie, E. R. Rieke, E. M. Hewett, R. J. Fisher, X. Z. Shu, and G. D. Prestwich, “Dual growth factor-induced angiogenesis in vivo using hyaluronan hydrogel implants,” Biomaterials, vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 1868–1875, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  42. W. M. Pardridge, “Drug targeting to the brain,” Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 1733–1744, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  43. Y. Lv, N. K. V. Cheung, and B. M. Fu, “A pharmacokinetic model for radioimmunotherapy delivered through cerebrospinal fluid for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases,” Journal of Nuclear Medicine, vol. 50, no. 8, pp. 1324–1331, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  44. G. Li, W. Yuan, and B. M. Fu, “A model for water and solute transport across the blood-brain barrier,” Journal of Biomechanics, vol. 43, no. 11, pp. 2133–2140, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  45. G. Li, M. J. Simon, L. M. Cancel et al., “Permeability of endothelial and astrocyte cocultures: in vitro blood-brain barrier models for drug delivery studies,” Annals of Biomedical Engineering, pp. 1–13, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  46. R. Gabathuler, “Approaches to transport therapeutic drugs across the blood-brain barrier to treat brain diseases,” Neurobiology of Disease, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 48–57, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  47. W. M. Pardridge, “Blood-brain barrier drug targeting: the future of brain drug development,” Mol Interv, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 90–51, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. W. M. Pardridge, “Molecular Trojan horses for blood-brain barrier drug delivery,” Current Opinion in Pharmacology, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 494–500, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  49. G. Miller, “Drug targeting: breaking down barriers,” Science, vol. 297, no. 5584, pp. 1116–1118, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  50. S. Gosk, C. Vermehren, G. Storm, and T. Moos, “Targeting anti-transferrin receptor antibody (OX26) and OX26-conjugated liposomes to brain capillary endothelial cells using in situ perfusion,” Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, vol. 24, no. 11, pp. 1193–1204, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  51. A. S. Johnson, R. J. Fisher, G. C. Weir, and C. K. Colton, “Oxygen consumption and diffusion in assemblages of respiring spheres: performance enhancement of a bioartificial pancreas,” Chemical Engineering Science, vol. 64, no. 22, pp. 4470–4487, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. N. Doshi, A. J. Swiston, J. B. Gilbert et al., “Cell-based drug delivery devices using phagocytosis-resistant backpacks,” Advanced Materials, vol. 23, no. 12, pp. H105–H109, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  53. S. Suematsu and T. Watanabe, “Generation of a synthetic lymphoid tissue-like organoid in mice,” Nature Biotechnology, vol. 22, no. 12, pp. 1539–1545, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  54. J. M. Zook, R. I. MacCuspie, L. E. Locascio, M. D. Halter, and J. T. Elliott, “Stable nanoparticle aggregates/agglomeratesof different sizes and the effect of their size on hemolytic cytotoxicity,” Nanotoxicology. In press.
  55. J. D. Bronzino, Ed., Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, Fla, USA, 3rd edition, 2006.
  56. K. L. Douglas, S. D. Carrigan, and M. Tabrizian, “Nano-materials; perspectives and possibilities in nano-medicine,” in BME Handbook, Tissue Engineering and Artificial Organs Volume, Chapter 26, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, Fla, USA, 3rd edition, 2006. View at Google Scholar