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Journal of Drug Delivery
Volume 2013, Article ID 616197, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/616197
Review Article

MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

1Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King’s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK
2Department of Experimental Medicine, Imperial College, St. Mary’s Hospital, Praed Street, London W2 1NY, UK

Received 18 November 2012; Accepted 5 February 2013

Academic Editor: Andreas G. Tzakos

Copyright © 2013 M. Thanou and W. Gedroyc. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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