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Experimental Diabetes Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 438238, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/438238
Research Article

TXNIP Links Innate Host Defense Mechanisms to Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Retinal Muller Glia under Chronic Hyperglycemia: Implications for Diabetic Retinopathy

1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
2Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3Department of Ophthalmology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Received 14 July 2011; Accepted 27 November 2011

Academic Editor: Muthuswamy Balasubramanyam

Copyright © 2012 Takhellambam S. Devi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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