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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 562625, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/562625
Research Article

Generating and Reversing Chronic Wounds in Diabetic Mice by Manipulating Wound Redox Parameters

1Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
2Bioengineering Interdepartmental Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
3Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
4Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
5Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA

Received 5 September 2014; Revised 18 November 2014; Accepted 18 November 2014; Published 23 December 2014

Academic Editor: Ronald G. Tilton

Copyright © 2014 Sandeep Dhall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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