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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 341583, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/341583
Review Article

Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

1Neurovascular Hypertension and Kidney Disease Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
2School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
3Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
4Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
5School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Level 3, MRF Building, Rear 50 Murray Street, Perth, WA 6000, Australia

Received 15 December 2014; Accepted 30 March 2015

Academic Editor: Janet H. Southerland

Copyright © 2015 Alicia A. Thorp and Markus P. Schlaich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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