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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 373708, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/373708
Review Article

Skewed Epigenetics: An Alternative Therapeutic Option for Diabetes Complications

Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Corso Dogliotti 14, 10126 Turin, Italy

Received 23 December 2014; Revised 7 April 2015; Accepted 22 April 2015

Academic Editor: Jun Panee

Copyright © 2015 Gabriele Togliatto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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