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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 6238526, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6238526
Research Article

Transcriptome Profiles Using Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Liver Changes in the Early Stage of Diabetes in Tree Shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis)

1Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223, China
2Key Laboratory of Puer Tea Science, Ministry of Education, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China
3State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223, China
4School of Life Sciences, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui 230601, China
5Kunming College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650204, China

Received 18 August 2015; Revised 6 February 2016; Accepted 18 February 2016

Academic Editor: Kim Connelly

Copyright © 2016 Xiaoyun Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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