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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4262536, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4262536
Research Article

Liver Biomarkers and Lipid Profiles in Mexican and Mexican-American 10- to 14-Year-Old Adolescents at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

1Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Paseo Tollocan Esq. Jesús Carranza. Col. Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, MEX, Mexico
2Department of Family Medicine, Texas Prevention Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
3Department of Pediatrics, Texas Prevention Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Roxana Valdés-Ramos; xm.xemeau@rsedlavr

Received 21 March 2017; Accepted 3 July 2017; Published 26 July 2017

Academic Editor: Tarunveer Singh Ahluwalia

Copyright © 2017 Ana Cecilia Fernández-Gaxiola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) are markers for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); alkaline phosphatase is a marker of liver disease. Mexican-American adolescents are disproportionately affected by T2DM, while in Mexico its prevalence is emerging. We assessed liver biomarkers and lipid profiles among Mexican and Mexican-American adolescents 10–14 years old with high/low risk of T2DM through a cross-sectional, descriptive study (Texas ; Mexico ). We included family medical histories, anthropometry, and blood pressure. Obesity was present in one-third of subjects in both sites. ALT (UL) was higher () in high-risk adolescents (23.5 ± 19.5 versus 17.2 ± 13.4 for males, 19.7 ± 11.6 versus 15.1 ± 5.5 for females), in Toluca and in Texas (26.0 ± 14.7 versus 20.0 ± 13.2 for males, 18.2 ± 13.4 versus 14.6 ± 10.1 for females), as well as GGT (UL) () (18.7 ± 11.1 versus 12.4 ± 2.3 for males, 13.6 ± 5.8 versus 11.5 ± 3.9 for Mexican females; 21.0 ± 6.8 versus 15.4 ± 5.5 for males, 14.3 ± 5.0 versus 13.8 ± 5.3 for females in Texas). We found no differences by sex or BMI. Total cholesterol and HDL were higher among Mexican-Americans (). In conclusion, multiple risk factors were present in the sample. We found differences by gender and between high and low risk for T2DM adolescents in all liver enzymes in both sites.