Journal of Diabetes Research

Animal Models of Diabetes and Metabolic Disease


Publishing date
12 Apr 2013
Status
Published
Submission deadline
23 Nov 2012

Lead Editor

1Biological/Pharmacological Research Laboratories, Central Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Japan Tobacco, Inc., Osaka 569-1125, Japan

2Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan

3Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Division of Life and Food Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan

4Division of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Japan

5Section on Genetics and Epidemiology, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA


Animal Models of Diabetes and Metabolic Disease

Description

Metabolic diseases including diabetes (and its complications), obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are common diseases and frequently occur in combination. To study these diseases, many hereditary animal models have been reported, such as ob/ob mice, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima-Fatty (OLETF) rats, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats, Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR), Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, and Postprandial Hypertriglyceridemia (PHT) rabbits. Chemical- (e.g., streptozotocin (STZ) and alloxan) and diet- (e.g., high sucrose, high fat, and high cholesterol) induced experimental animal models have been used generally for a long time, and genetically modified animals have also been used widely in recent decades. Although molecular biological techniques have become more important to clarify the mechanism of the diseases, the importance of animal model has not changed. The animal models are needed to reveal the pathophysiology of metabolic diseases, and the approach still provides helpful information to develop new therapies and drugs for these diseases. In this special issue, we aim at providing information on recent beneficial experimental animal models in this field, and up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, therapeutic drugs, and diagnosis of metabolic diseases using valuable animal models is also welcome.

We invite investigators to contribute original research as well as review articles that will stimulate the continuing efforts towards understanding the pathophysiology, developing new drugs, and creating new approaches to treat these diseases. We are particularly interested in articles that describe the recently developed experimental animal models, of both hereditary and genetically modified types. Comparing or suggesting what the best models for each disease is also encouraged. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Animal models to evaluate and understand the pathophysiology of diabetes and other metabolic diseases
  • New aspects of animal models to treat metabolic syndrome
  • Pathophysiology and interventional studies of diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension using animal models
  • Recent advances in treating diabetes and its complications from nonclinical studies

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jdr/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 281928
  • - Editorial

Animal Models of Diabetes and Metabolic Disease

Tomohiko Sasase | Marcus G. Pezzolesi | ... | Kozo Matsumoto
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 761314
  • - Review Article

Cardiovascular Changes in Animal Models of Metabolic Syndrome

Alexandre M. Lehnen | Bruno Rodrigues | ... | Beatriz D’Agord Schaan
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 940710
  • - Review Article

Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in Mouse Models of Type 1 Diabetes

Cathleen Petzold | Julia Riewaldt | ... | Karsten Kretschmer
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 175901
  • - Research Article

Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Ranirestat, a Potent Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, on Diabetic Cataract and Neuropathy in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Rats

Ayumi Ota | Akihiro Kakehashi | ... | Yasunori Kanazawa
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 138412
  • - Review Article

Rodent Models for Investigating the Dysregulation of Immune Responses in Type 1 Diabetes

Feng-Cheng Chou | Heng-Yi Chen | ... | Huey-Kang Sytwu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 401723
  • - Review Article

Spontaneous Type 2 Diabetic Rodent Models

Yang-wei Wang | Guang-dong Sun | ... | Li-ning Miao
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 103731
  • - Research Article

A Novel Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes: The Zucker Fatty Diabetes Mellitus ZFDM Rat

Norihide Yokoi | Masayuki Hoshino | ... | Susumu Seino
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 608923
  • - Research Article

Dose Effect and Mode of Inheritance of Diabetogenic Gene on Mouse Chromosome 11

Naru Babaya | Hironori Ueda | ... | Hiroshi Ikegami
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 986462
  • - Research Article

Phenotypic Characterization of LEA Rat: A New Rat Model of Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes

Tadashi Okamura | Xiang Yuan Pei | ... | Noriyuki Kasai
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 976209
  • - Review Article

The Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Rat: An Animal Model of Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes with Severe Diabetic Complications

Tomohiko Sasase | Takeshi Ohta | ... | Masami Shinohara
Journal of Diabetes Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision90 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore3.020
Impact Factor3.040
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