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Journal of Energy
Volume 2014, Article ID 514029, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/514029
Research Article

Does Climate Change Mitigation Activity Affect Crude Oil Prices? Evidence from Dynamic Panel Model

Economics Division, University of Stirling, Cottrell Building, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK

Received 3 August 2014; Revised 31 October 2014; Accepted 23 November 2014; Published 11 December 2014

Academic Editor: Jin-Li Hu

Copyright © 2014 Jude C. Dike. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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