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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2009, Article ID 316249, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/316249
Research Article

A Critical Assessment of Geographic Clusters of Breast and Lung Cancer Incidences among Residents Living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA

Advanced Geospatial Analysis Lab, Department of Geography and Environmental Resources, Southern Illinois University, 1000 Faner Drive, MC 4514, Carbondale, IL 62901-4514, USA

Received 25 February 2009; Accepted 2 September 2009

Academic Editor: Habibul Ahsan

Copyright © 2009 Olga A. Guajardo and Tonny J. Oyana. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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