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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 184745, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/184745
Review Article

Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review

1Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1
2Clinical Epidemiology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Y 4E9
3Environmental Health Clinic, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1B2
4Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 1W7

Received 16 July 2011; Accepted 23 October 2011

Academic Editor: Gerry Schwalfenberg

Copyright © 2012 Margaret E. Sears et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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