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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 185731, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/185731
Clinical Study

Human Excretion of Bisphenol A: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study

1Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2935-66 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6K 4C1
2Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2B7
3Environmental Division, ALS Laboratory Group, Edmonton AB, Canada T6E 5C1
4Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2C8

Received 16 July 2011; Revised 10 September 2011; Accepted 26 September 2011

Academic Editor: Robin Bernhoft

Copyright © 2012 Stephen J. Genuis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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