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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012, Article ID 565690, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/565690
Research Article

Human Impairment from Living near Confined Animal (Hog) Feeding Operations

1Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
2Neuro-Test, Inc., 3250 Mesaloa Lane, Pasadena, CA 91107, USA

Received 16 June 2011; Accepted 18 October 2011

Academic Editor: Gerry Schwalfenberg

Copyright © 2012 Kaye H. Kilburn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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