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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 162731, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/162731
Research Article

Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

1Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
2Department of Physical Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA

Received 18 April 2013; Accepted 7 August 2013

Academic Editor: Ike S. Okosun

Copyright © 2013 Melissa Bopp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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