Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2013, Article ID 256151, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/256151
Research Article

Impact of Blood Sample Collection and Processing Methods on Glucose Levels in Community Outreach Studies

1Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
3Department of Pathology and Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
4Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY 10962, USA
5Brain, Obesity, and Diabetes Laboratory (BODyLab), New York University School of Medicine, 145 East 32nd Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 11 October 2012; Accepted 20 December 2012

Academic Editor: Linda M. Gerber

Copyright © 2013 Michael Turchiano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Glucose obtained from unprocessed blood samples can decrease by 5%–7% per hour due to glycolysis. This study compared the impact of glucose degradation on measured glucose values by examining two different collection methods. For the first method, blood samples were collected in tubes containing sodium fluoride (NaF), a glycolysis inhibitor. For the second method, blood samples were collected in tubes containing a clot activator and serum gel separator and were centrifuged to separate the serum and plasma 20 minutes after sample collection. The samples used in the two methods were collected during the same blood draw and were assayed by the clinical laboratory 2–4 hours after the samples were obtained. A total of 256 pairs of samples were analyzed. The average glucose reading for the centrifuged tubes was significantly higher than the NaF tubes by  mmol/L ( ) or 4.2%. This study demonstrates the important role collection methods play in accurately assessing glucose levels of blood samples collected in the field, where working environment may be suboptimal. Therefore, blood samples collected in the field should be promptly centrifuged before being transported to clinical labs to ensure accurate glucose level measurements.