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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2013, Article ID 896789, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/896789
Review Article

Role of Environmental Chemicals in Obesity: A Systematic Review on the Current Evidence

1Child Growth and Development Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81676-36954, Iran
2Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81676-36954, Iran
3Environment Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81676-36954, Iran

Received 27 March 2013; Accepted 7 May 2013

Academic Editor: Mohammad Mehdi Amin

Copyright © 2013 Roya Kelishadi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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