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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2016, Article ID 8791686, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8791686
Research Article

Revisiting Nonresidential Environmental Exposures and Childhood Lead Poisoning in the US: Findings from Kansas, 2000–2005

1University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
2University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
3University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Received 13 October 2015; Revised 18 December 2015; Accepted 26 January 2016

Academic Editor: Terry Tudor

Copyright © 2016 Lu Ann Brink et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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